The Book of Revelation : Introduction (Taipo Bible Reading Marathon Day 788)

The Book of Revelation : Introduction (Taipo Bible Reading Marathon
Day 788)

BOOK NAME

Revelation, also called the Revelation to John, the Apocalypse of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation or Apocalypse.

BIBLE CATEGORY

The 27th Book of the New Testament (the last Book of the Holy Bible).

THE AUTHOR AND DATE OF WRITING.

The author names himself in the text as “John” see Ch1:1.
Many believes that this John is no other than John the Apostle, who is also the author of the Gospel of John, and the Epistles of John 1, 2 and 3.

Early Church tradition dates the book to end of the emperor Domitian (reigned AD 81–96), and most modern scholars agree.

The author of the book calls himself John (Rev 1:1, 4, 9; 22:8), who because of his Christian faith has been exiled to the rocky island of Patmos, a Roman penal colony. Although he never claims to be John the apostle, whose name is attached to the fourth gospel, he was so identified by several of the early church Fathers, including Justin, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, Cyprian, and Hippolytus. This identification, however, was denied by other Fathers, including Denis of Alexandria, Eusebius of
Caesarea, Cyril of Jerusalem, Gregory Nazianzen, and John Chrysostom. Indeed, vocabulary, grammar, and style make it doubtful that the book could have been put into its present form by the same person(s) responsible for the fourth gospel. Nevertheless, there are definite linguistic and theological affinities between the two books. The tone of the letters to the seven churches (Rev 1:4–3:22) is indicative of the great authority the author enjoyed over the Christian communities in Asia. It is possible, therefore, that he
was a disciple of John the apostle, who is traditionally associated with that part of the world. The date of the book in its present form is probably near the end of the reign of Domitian (A.D. 81–96), a fierce persecutor of the Christians. (source:NABRE)

Purpose of Writing:

Revelation is an apocalyptic prophecy with an epistolary introduction addressed to seven churches in the Roman province of Asia. “Apocalypse” means the revealing of divine mysteries; John is to write down what is revealed (what he sees in his vision) and
send it to the seven churches (Ch1:4).

The Book

The Book of Revelation is perhaps the most mysterious book in Sacred Scripture. And there has been much speculation about it —
some of it bordering on off-the-wall, but some of it serious and scholarly.

The Apocalypse, or Revelation to John, the last book of the Bible, is one of the most difficult to understand because it abounds in unfamiliar and extravagant symbolism, which at best appears unusual to the modern reader. Symbolic language, however, is one of the chief characteristics of apocalyptic literature, of which this book is an outstanding example.

This book contains an account of visions in symbolic and allegorical language borrowed extensively from the Old Testament, especially Ezekiel, Zechariah, and Daniel. Whether or not these visions were real experiences of the author or simply literary conventions employed by him is an open question.

The Book of Revelation had its origin in a time of crisis, but it remains valid and meaningful for Christians of all time. In the face of apparently insuperable evil, either from within or from without, all Christians are called to trust in Jesus’ promise,
“Behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age” (Mt 28:20). Those who remain steadfast in their faith and confidence in the risen Lord need have no fear. Suffering, persecution, even death by martyrdom, though remaining impenetrable mysteries of
evil, do not comprise an absurd dead end. No matter what adversity or sacrifice Christians may endure, they will in the end triumph over Satan and his forces because of their fidelity to Christ the victor. This is the enduring message of the book; it is a message
of hope and consolation and challenge for all who dare to believe.
(source:NABRE)

 

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